21ST CENTURY JOB SKILLS BLOG


Building an Emotionally Intelligent Workplace? Start with How You Recruit


Oct 05, 2020






“Insanity is repeating the same mistakes and expecting different results.” 

This quote has been misattributed to Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and Marie Curie. Even though none of them said it, it’s a popular quote because there’s a whole lot of truth to it.

 

Its converse is true, too: If you want a different result, change the process.

 

Are You Frustrated Trying to Find Emotionally Intelligent Workers?

 

As more work tasks become automated and fields become super-specialized, work happens in teams. But employers express increasing frustration as they try to find workers who collaborate well. They possess the technical skills, but they’re not as proficient at working with other people.

 

A different hiring process yields different staffing results

 

When it comes to procedures and forms, hiring processes have gotten more complicated over the years. But even though prospects submit resumes over the internet and computers handle the first round of screenings, the job search experience hasn’t changed much, even though the workplace is nothing like it was 30 years ago. The hiring process is still the same monotonous job posting and the same tired interview questions.

 

(yawning sloth gif)

via GIPHY

(to see: https://giphy.com/gifs/sloth-yawn-d5mI2F3MxCTJu)

 

What happens if you apply emotionally intelligent processes to the entire recruiting process? Would it be more likely to attract emotionally intelligent prospects?

 

What Is Emotional Intelligence and Why Is It So Important?

 

Barry Chignell defines emotional intelligence (also called EQ) as “someone’s ability to perceive, understand and manage their own emotions.”  But not only that, EQ strongly refers to how people relate to others.

 

The 5 key characteristics of emotional intelligence are:

  1. Self-awareness
  2. Self-regulation
  3. Intrinsic or internal motivation
  4. Empathy
  5. Social skills

 

Emotionally-intelligent people know what they are thinking and feeling. They’re good at deciding the best way to act upon those thoughts and feelings. Also, they do their job and take initiative because they care and it’s the right thing to do. Emotionally intelligent people relate to others and can see issues from another person’s perspective. They know how to interact with other people in healthy and considerate ways.

 

Emotionally intelligent team members make leadership easier for the team manager. They make things easier for everyone involved. Workers with EQ are an amazing asset to any company. So how do you attract them?

 

When You’re Recruiting, Put Your Best Foot Forward from the Very Start

 

Applicants are generally told to “put their best foot forward” when they’re trying to impress a potential employer and get the job -- but the interview process is more like a date. A qualified prospect is sizing you up as much as you’re trying to see if they’re a good fit, so you need to put your best foot forward, too.

 

(Scary thought: if you think about it, the hiring process is like a G-rated season of The Bachelor.)

 

Show off your emotional intelligence from the start with the job posting

 

Take the job posting seriously. Follow these steps:

  1. Give it some thought. Gather a few key people together to discuss the position. Include the other leaders and team members who’ll be working with the person who fills this position.
  2. Be realistic. Is this really a position that requires 10 years experience? Is HubSpot certification essential or can they train for it after they’re hired? Make your criteria tight. Stick to essential requirements and preferences -- long lists alienate good prospects. The perfect applicant for the job doesn’t always check every box.
  3. Combine hard skills and soft skills. Determine what technical skills are necessary for the job, but also what interpersonal skills they’ll need. Does the position need someone who excels at written communication? Would conflict management be necessary? Teamwork requires collaboration skills. Remote workers should be self-motivated.
  4. Be interesting. This is the place to let applicants know why you’re a great company for them. Phrase your statements so they can visualize themselves working there. Do you want someone who not only can code, but loves it? Then use “passionate.” Someone who loves what they do will be a better employee.

 

Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

 

The Emotionally Intelligent Interview Process

 

Consider stepping out from the routine to make the interview process unique.

 

Change the environment

 

Get away from the conference table or desk. Give the interviewee a tour and see how they interact with prospective managers and colleagues. You’re giving them an inside view of what work life will be like and you get to see how they interact.

 

Or consider meeting over coffee or a meal.  It might be more open and friendly and give you some outside-the-office insights.

 

Ask Valid Questions

 

Laszlo Bock, the former head of HR for Google, was famous for the unusual questions he’d ask during interviews. He wanted to measure creativity and throw the candidate off their guard.  At some point, he realized the questions didn’t measure workplace success -- they just helped Google feel morally superior.

 

Ask questions that get to the heart of what you want to know.

 

Use behavioral questions

 

Behavioral questions often begin with “Tell me about a time when you…” You’re giving candidates the opportunity to think back and show how their soft skills came into play, including emotional intelligence.

 

Most interviewees won’t get specific with the first answer because they’re also gauging your response. They want to know if you’re safe. Probe for details and encourage more detail.

 

Understand what you’re measuring

 

 You’re not evaluating the level of their career success -- if you’re looking for emotional intelligence, more than anything, you’re looking for insight:

  • Are they aware of their role in the situations they shared with you or do they blame someone else (and do they show a pattern)?
  • What motivates them?
  • Can they problem-solve?
  • How are they relating to their colleagues or leaders in their stories?
  • How are they expressing themselves? Are they opening up?

 

Good employees aren’t perfect. Employees with problem-solving abilities and initiative often find tremendous success, but they sometimes make mistakes. When you ask about times that didn’t go well, you get to hear how they interpreted the situation and how they recovered. You’re also demonstrating that you don’t expect perfection and that you value initiative. An emotionally intelligent workplace makes room for error if you want workers who are able to take calculated risks.

 

“If you want a different result, change the process.”

 

Be Consistent

 

Interviews tend to be one of the most inconsistent processes that a company undertakes. One interview generally doesn’t even look close to the next. Use the same questions, the same process, and the same environments so that you are accurately comparing your candidates with each other.

 

Keep the Process Short

 

Job searchers want quick resolution. Remember, you’re competing with other companies to work with them as much as they are competing to work for you. Communicate each step of the process and definitely let them know when you reach a decision. Even if you don’t give them an offer, they’ll appreciate that you showed respect.

 

An Emotionally Intelligent Hiring Process Attracts Emotionally Intelligent Candidates

 

If you want emotionally intelligent employees, attract them with an emotionally intelligent hiring process. Assess your whole hiring process with the end goal in mind.

 

If you feel like this is an area you should explore to be a more effective recruiter, our course Develop Your Emotional Intelligence for the 21st Century will give you a solid foundation that you can build from. You’ll gain significant insight in only 90 minutes, and you’ll be ready to set the stage for your more emotionally intelligent workplace.

 

Sources:

How to Improve Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

Former Google HR Leader Says Best Hiring Practices Are Not Sexy -- For a Reason

“Insanity is repeating the same mistakes and expecting different results.” 

This quote has been misattributed to Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and Marie Curie. Even though none of them said it, it’s a popular quote because there’s a whole lot of truth to it.

 

Its converse is true, too: If you want a different result, change the process.

 

Are You Frustrated Trying to Find Emotionally Intelligent Workers?

 

As more work tasks become automated and fields become super-specialized, work happens in teams. But employers express increasing frustration as they try to find workers who collaborate well. They possess the technical skills, but they’re not as proficient at working with other people.

 

A different hiring process yields different staffing results

 

When it comes to procedures and forms, hiring processes have gotten more complicated over the years. But even though prospects submit resumes over the internet and computers handle the first round of screenings, the job search experience hasn’t changed much, even though the workplace is nothing like it was 30 years ago. The hiring process is still the same monotonous job posting and the same tired interview questions.

 

(yawning sloth gif)

via GIPHY

(to see: https://giphy.com/gifs/sloth-yawn-d5mI2F3MxCTJu)

 

What happens if you apply emotionally intelligent processes to the entire recruiting process? Would it be more likely to attract emotionally intelligent prospects?

 

What Is Emotional Intelligence and Why Is It So Important?

 

Barry Chignell defines emotional intelligence (also called EQ) as “someone’s ability to perceive, understand and manage their own emotions.”  But not only that, EQ strongly refers to how people relate to others.

 

The 5 key characteristics of emotional intelligence are:

  1. Self-awareness
  2. Self-regulation
  3. Intrinsic or internal motivation
  4. Empathy
  5. Social skills

 

Emotionally-intelligent people know what they are thinking and feeling. They’re good at deciding the best way to act upon those thoughts and feelings. Also, they do their job and take initiative because they care and it’s the right thing to do. Emotionally intelligent people relate to others and can see issues from another person’s perspective. They know how to interact with other people in healthy and considerate ways.

 

Emotionally intelligent team members make leadership easier for the team manager. They make things easier for everyone involved. Workers with EQ are an amazing asset to any company. So how do you attract them?

 

When You’re Recruiting, Put Your Best Foot Forward from the Very Start

 

Applicants are generally told to “put their best foot forward” when they’re trying to impress a potential employer and get the job -- but the interview process is more like a date. A qualified prospect is sizing you up as much as you’re trying to see if they’re a good fit, so you need to put your best foot forward, too.

 

(Scary thought: if you think about it, the hiring process is like a G-rated season of The Bachelor.)

 

Show off your emotional intelligence from the start with the job posting

 

Take the job posting seriously. Follow these steps:

  1. Give it some thought. Gather a few key people together to discuss the position. Include the other leaders and team members who’ll be working with the person who fills this position.
  2. Be realistic. Is this really a position that requires 10 years experience? Is HubSpot certification essential or can they train for it after they’re hired? Make your criteria tight. Stick to essential requirements and preferences -- long lists alienate good prospects. The perfect applicant for the job doesn’t always check every box.
  3. Combine hard skills and soft skills. Determine what technical skills are necessary for the job, but also what interpersonal skills they’ll need. Does the position need someone who excels at written communication? Would conflict management be necessary? Teamwork requires collaboration skills. Remote workers should be self-motivated.
  4. Be interesting. This is the place to let applicants know why you’re a great company for them. Phrase your statements so they can visualize themselves working there. Do you want someone who not only can code, but loves it? Then use “passionate.” Someone who loves what they do will be a better employee.

 

Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

 

The Emotionally Intelligent Interview Process

 

Consider stepping out from the routine to make the interview process unique.

 

Change the environment

 

Get away from the conference table or desk. Give the interviewee a tour and see how they interact with prospective managers and colleagues. You’re giving them an inside view of what work life will be like and you get to see how they interact.

 

Or consider meeting over coffee or a meal.  It might be more open and friendly and give you some outside-the-office insights.

 

Ask Valid Questions

 

Laszlo Bock, the former head of HR for Google, was famous for the unusual questions he’d ask during interviews. He wanted to measure creativity and throw the candidate off their guard.  At some point, he realized the questions didn’t measure workplace success -- they just helped Google feel morally superior.

 

Ask questions that get to the heart of what you want to know.

 

Use behavioral questions

 

Behavioral questions often begin with “Tell me about a time when you…” You’re giving candidates the opportunity to think back and show how their soft skills came into play, including emotional intelligence.

 

Most interviewees won’t get specific with the first answer because they’re also gauging your response. They want to know if you’re safe. Probe for details and encourage more detail.

 

Understand what you’re measuring

 

 You’re not evaluating the level of their career success -- if you’re looking for emotional intelligence, more than anything, you’re looking for insight:

  • Are they aware of their role in the situations they shared with you or do they blame someone else (and do they show a pattern)?
  • What motivates them?
  • Can they problem-solve?
  • How are they relating to their colleagues or leaders in their stories?
  • How are they expressing themselves? Are they opening up?

 

Good employees aren’t perfect. Employees with problem-solving abilities and initiative often find tremendous success, but they sometimes make mistakes. When you ask about times that didn’t go well, you get to hear how they interpreted the situation and how they recovered. You’re also demonstrating that you don’t expect perfection and that you value initiative. An emotionally intelligent workplace makes room for error if you want workers who are able to take calculated risks.

 

“If you want a different result, change the process.”

 

Be Consistent

 

Interviews tend to be one of the most inconsistent processes that a company undertakes. One interview generally doesn’t even look close to the next. Use the same questions, the same process, and the same environments so that you are accurately comparing your candidates with each other.

 

Keep the Process Short

 

Job searchers want quick resolution. Remember, you’re competing with other companies to work with them as much as they are competing to work for you. Communicate each step of the process and definitely let them know when you reach a decision. Even if you don’t give them an offer, they’ll appreciate that you showed respect.

 

An Emotionally Intelligent Hiring Process Attracts Emotionally Intelligent Candidates

 

If you want emotionally intelligent employees, attract them with an emotionally intelligent hiring process. Assess your whole hiring process with the end goal in mind.

 

If you feel like this is an area you should explore to be a more effective recruiter, our course Develop Your Emotional Intelligence for the 21st Century will give you a solid foundation that you can build from. You’ll gain significant insight in only 90 minutes, and you’ll be ready to set the stage for your more emotionally intelligent workplace.

 

Sources:

How to Improve Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

Former Google HR Leader Says Best Hiring Practices Are Not Sexy -- For a Reason



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