21ST CENTURY JOB SKILLS BLOG


How Emotional Intelligence Equips You to Lead People


Nov 02, 2020






5 Ways Emotional Intelligence Equips you to Lead People

 

Today’s workplace moves at breakneck speed. If businesses don’t keep up with technology, offerings, content marketing, and approaches, they get left in the dust.

 

It’s easy to become focused on data, production, and theories and lose the human side of leading your team.

 

At 21st Century Job Skills, we like to highlight that automation, robotics, and technology free up human workers to focus on the things that humans do best -- deal with other humans. Which is why soft skills are so crucial -- because they’re the human skills.

 

Even more crucial for humans who lead humans… like you.

 

When team members feel like they’re secondary to production or data, they get out of sync. Companies often have mission statements and lists of company values on display, but if those values stay on the wall where they’re posted instead of flowing through day-to-day operations, employees get disheartened and feel devalued. This affects their relationships and productivity. And those workers have a tendency to jump ship.

 

Leaders Who Rely on Emotional Intelligence are Heart-Led Leaders

 

What is emotional intelligence?

 

Psychology Today describes emotional intelligence like this:

 

Emotional intelligence is generally said to include at least three skills: emotional awareness, or the ability to identify and name one’s own emotions; the ability to harness those emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problem solving; and the ability to manage emotions, which includes both regulating one’s own emotions when necessary and helping others to do the same.

 

Emotional intelligence is a collection of five traits (or more) that contribute to a healthy emotional balance and the ability to connect and relate to others in your life. They include:

 

  • Self-awareness -- including awareness of your own emotional state.
  • Self regulation -- being able to manage your emotions and your response while dealing with them, self control, adaptability, and openness to new ideas.
  • Motivation -- commitment, innovation, drive, and optimism.
  • Empathy -- the ability to feel what others feel and relate to their experiences.
  • Social skills -- the ability to work with others and navigate relationships in healthy ways.

 

Why invest the effort in emotional intelligence?

 

Old school managers might think that their workers shouldn’t need this kind of connection. Work is about getting the job done.

 

But workers crave connection and perform better when they receive it. It makes sense -- your team members are giving you at least 8-9 hours a day. Factor in the commute to and from work, and you’re getting more time from them than their family does. They spend more time in the office than they do awake at home.

 

Treating employees like they’re just another cog in the machine doesn’t work anymore --if it ever did. They have more options...they’re with you by choice. It’s up to you to create an environment worth working in where they can grow, connect, and find some level of meaning in their work.

 

Using Your Emotional Intelligence: Five Steps You Can Take to Make a Better Work Environment for Your Team

 

Establish Positive Relationships 

 

As a leader, you’re having an ongoing relationship with your employees. The way you relate and interact with your team can have critical consequences in your workplace.

 

If you encourage a positive mindset among your team, make yourself available, and listen with attention and empathy to your employees, they’ll respond with positivity. By giving support to them, they’ll do the same for you.

 

Be Connected

 

Your business isn’t just about the services and contributions you make, but also how you work with others. Nurture strong relationships inside your workforce to give yourself and your company a stronger foundation. It's all about being on the same wavelength and working together.

 

Create opportunities for your team to connect outside the office and even have one-on-one lunches or coffees with team members to really get to know them and let them get to know you. Be aware of what their goals and desires are, in and out of the workplace. You might be in a place to help them achieve their dreams.

 

Encourage Trust

 

How do you build trust? You build trust by giving trust.

 

  1. Give your workers the opportunities to grow into their own leadership skills. Give them more authority in projects and more opportunities to learn critical thinking and decision-making skills.
  2. When you do need to give feedback or correction, make it a positive experience. Use a “feedback sandwich:” share positive feedback on some aspect of their work, then address what they need to improve, and close it off with another piece of positive feedback.
  3. Encourage open communication, consistency, and positive interaction among your team and with you.

 

Having a safe environment where team members know they can rely on you goes a long way toward inspiring quality work from workers who are invested in the good of the project, the company, and the team.

 

Be true to yourself

 

Be true to yourself, your values, and your convictions. Speak the truth to your team members and be genuine. Respect them with the respect you want to receive back.

 

Show you care

 

You can’t fake genuine concern for others. People can tell. If you show a sincere interest in your employees, they know it. They feel valued and respected as human beings.

 

Emotional Intelligence is an Investment in the Future

 

You invest a lot in your employees -- you train them, pay them, guide them, and provide benefits. If you make it possible for them to pay their bills and provide for their families, it only makes sense to provide for their mental wellness, too.

 

Your employees are whole humans, and food in the fridge and money in the bank is only a part of who they are -- however, that’s already a huge investment. And if your employees aren’t satisfied with their work or feel appreciated, that investment might disappear.

 

You’re all together every weekday for hours at a time. Invest in those relationships by using your skills in perceiving emotions to connect with them at a deeper level and create a fulfilling work experience. It will benefit you, too.

 

Take action now to make a difference

 

Invest in your team now. Commit to taking different team members out for coffee over the course of the next couple of months -- and ask them what their goals are. Learn about their families. Assess ways to give them more responsibility and reward it when they meet the challenge.

 

You’ll find your own sense of job satisfaction increases, too. Relating to others on a deeper level benefits everybody -- including you.

5 Ways Emotional Intelligence Equips you to Lead People

 

Today’s workplace moves at breakneck speed. If businesses don’t keep up with technology, offerings, content marketing, and approaches, they get left in the dust.

 

It’s easy to become focused on data, production, and theories and lose the human side of leading your team.

 

At 21st Century Job Skills, we like to highlight that automation, robotics, and technology free up human workers to focus on the things that humans do best -- deal with other humans. Which is why soft skills are so crucial -- because they’re the human skills.

 

Even more crucial for humans who lead humans… like you.

 

When team members feel like they’re secondary to production or data, they get out of sync. Companies often have mission statements and lists of company values on display, but if those values stay on the wall where they’re posted instead of flowing through day-to-day operations, employees get disheartened and feel devalued. This affects their relationships and productivity. And those workers have a tendency to jump ship.

 

Leaders Who Rely on Emotional Intelligence are Heart-Led Leaders

 

What is emotional intelligence?

 

Psychology Today describes emotional intelligence like this:

 

Emotional intelligence is generally said to include at least three skills: emotional awareness, or the ability to identify and name one’s own emotions; the ability to harness those emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problem solving; and the ability to manage emotions, which includes both regulating one’s own emotions when necessary and helping others to do the same.

 

Emotional intelligence is a collection of five traits (or more) that contribute to a healthy emotional balance and the ability to connect and relate to others in your life. They include:

 

  • Self-awareness -- including awareness of your own emotional state.
  • Self regulation -- being able to manage your emotions and your response while dealing with them, self control, adaptability, and openness to new ideas.
  • Motivation -- commitment, innovation, drive, and optimism.
  • Empathy -- the ability to feel what others feel and relate to their experiences.
  • Social skills -- the ability to work with others and navigate relationships in healthy ways.

 

Why invest the effort in emotional intelligence?

 

Old school managers might think that their workers shouldn’t need this kind of connection. Work is about getting the job done.

 

But workers crave connection and perform better when they receive it. It makes sense -- your team members are giving you at least 8-9 hours a day. Factor in the commute to and from work, and you’re getting more time from them than their family does. They spend more time in the office than they do awake at home.

 

Treating employees like they’re just another cog in the machine doesn’t work anymore --if it ever did. They have more options...they’re with you by choice. It’s up to you to create an environment worth working in where they can grow, connect, and find some level of meaning in their work.

 

Using Your Emotional Intelligence: Five Steps You Can Take to Make a Better Work Environment for Your Team

 

Establish Positive Relationships 

 

As a leader, you’re having an ongoing relationship with your employees. The way you relate and interact with your team can have critical consequences in your workplace.

 

If you encourage a positive mindset among your team, make yourself available, and listen with attention and empathy to your employees, they’ll respond with positivity. By giving support to them, they’ll do the same for you.

 

Be Connected

 

Your business isn’t just about the services and contributions you make, but also how you work with others. Nurture strong relationships inside your workforce to give yourself and your company a stronger foundation. It's all about being on the same wavelength and working together.

 

Create opportunities for your team to connect outside the office and even have one-on-one lunches or coffees with team members to really get to know them and let them get to know you. Be aware of what their goals and desires are, in and out of the workplace. You might be in a place to help them achieve their dreams.

 

Encourage Trust

 

How do you build trust? You build trust by giving trust.

 

  1. Give your workers the opportunities to grow into their own leadership skills. Give them more authority in projects and more opportunities to learn critical thinking and decision-making skills.
  2. When you do need to give feedback or correction, make it a positive experience. Use a “feedback sandwich:” share positive feedback on some aspect of their work, then address what they need to improve, and close it off with another piece of positive feedback.
  3. Encourage open communication, consistency, and positive interaction among your team and with you.

 

Having a safe environment where team members know they can rely on you goes a long way toward inspiring quality work from workers who are invested in the good of the project, the company, and the team.

 

Be true to yourself

 

Be true to yourself, your values, and your convictions. Speak the truth to your team members and be genuine. Respect them with the respect you want to receive back.

 

Show you care

 

You can’t fake genuine concern for others. People can tell. If you show a sincere interest in your employees, they know it. They feel valued and respected as human beings.

 

Emotional Intelligence is an Investment in the Future

 

You invest a lot in your employees -- you train them, pay them, guide them, and provide benefits. If you make it possible for them to pay their bills and provide for their families, it only makes sense to provide for their mental wellness, too.

 

Your employees are whole humans, and food in the fridge and money in the bank is only a part of who they are -- however, that’s already a huge investment. And if your employees aren’t satisfied with their work or feel appreciated, that investment might disappear.

 

You’re all together every weekday for hours at a time. Invest in those relationships by using your skills in perceiving emotions to connect with them at a deeper level and create a fulfilling work experience. It will benefit you, too.

 

Take action now to make a difference

 

Invest in your team now. Commit to taking different team members out for coffee over the course of the next couple of months -- and ask them what their goals are. Learn about their families. Assess ways to give them more responsibility and reward it when they meet the challenge.

 

You’ll find your own sense of job satisfaction increases, too. Relating to others on a deeper level benefits everybody -- including you.



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